itswalky
angermonkey:

ilikeyourstuffs:

Good news, angermonkey!

I am from the land of Dinosaur Rodeos, but have moved to a place where people are killed by punctuation. Or menstrual periods? Possibly very tiny black holes??? Oh wait, NO deaths. Yes, we are all immortal here in the Hoosier state.

So much to love in this, though I think my favourites are North Dakota and South Dakota. Followed by Vermont and New Hampshire.

angermonkey:

ilikeyourstuffs:

Good news, angermonkey!

I am from the land of Dinosaur Rodeos, but have moved to a place where people are killed by punctuation. Or menstrual periods? Possibly very tiny black holes??? Oh wait, NO deaths. Yes, we are all immortal here in the Hoosier state.

So much to love in this, though I think my favourites are North Dakota and South Dakota. Followed by Vermont and New Hampshire.

paulstead

Question for my liturgical Christian followers…

paulstead:

theteastainedpages:

Do you guys find Father Ted offensive?

I’ve never found it to be disrespectful to Christianity/Catholicism, more making fun of the characters themselves and rural Irish culture. It’s so over the top that I find it hilarious, but I wondered what y’all’s opinions might be.

No. It’s hilarious, have you ever seen the Speed 3 episode? Funniest piece of British/Irish comedy ever.

"We need to do something practical!" 

image

graceandjustice

a-fictional-vaudeville:

midstorm:

I think Hiccup and Astrid are the best animated couple ever.

I love how their relationship isn’t a major plot point for the films. Astrid isn’t there as a reward for the hero, she is also his best friend (next to Toothless of course). She didn’t stop being a warrior after she became a love interest (and Hiccup wouldn’t want her to, he loves her for it).

They talk about their problems. They fight their enemies together. And they trust each other.

Something that I’m just noticing from these gifs. They actually lean their cheeks into the kisses, opposed to just letting the other do all the work.  That’s something actual couples do when they know each other well enough to know it’s coming.  I love this.

First of all, because anything that is causing you inner hurt afflicts you all the more for being contained, as the mind becomes fixated upon it. But when it is let out it is in a certain degree dissipated and the inner sadness to that extent diminished. For this reason when people are afflicted by sadness and vent it with tears and groans, or even tell of it in words, the sadness decreases.

A second reason is that human beings always get some pleasure out of acting appropriately, and weeping and groaning is just what the person who is sad and doleful should be doing. Being in this sort of way appropriate behaviour it gives a certain kind of mitigating pleasure that reduces the sadness.

St Thomas Aquinas on why it’s better to have a really good cry than to keep a stiff upper lip., quoted by Denys Turner, p.145.

Turner summarises Thomas’s remedies for the blues as follows: “weeping, groaning, therapeutic talk, prayer, friends, a good night’s sleep” (p.146).

paulstead
[I]t is about getting away from a view of the Church that is very seductive and very damaging – and very popular. This is the view that the Church is essentially a lot of people who have something in common called Christian faith and get together to share it with each other and communicate it to other people ‘outside’. It looks a harmless enough view at first, but it is a good way from what the New Testament encourages us to think about the Church – which is that the Church is first of all a kind of space cleared by God through Jesus in which people may become what God made them to be (God’s sons and daughters), and that what we have to do about the Church is not first to organise it as a society but to inhabit it as a climate or a landscape. It is a place where we can see properly – God, God’s creation, ourselves. It is a place or dimension in the universe that is in some way growing towards being the universe itself in restored relation to God. It is a place we are invited to enter, the place occupied by Christ, who is himself the climate and atmosphere of a renewed universe.
Rowan Williams: “The Christian Priest Today”
Link to full article. (via lostheskald)
In movies and magazines the ‘icon’ of marriage is always a youthful couple. But once, in the light and warmth of an autumn afternoon, this writer saw on the bench of a public square, in a poor Parisian suburb, an old and poor couple. They were sitting hand in hand, in silence, enjoying the pale light, the last warmth of the season. In silence: all words had been said, all passion exhausted, all storms at peace. The whole life was behind—yet all of it was now present, in this silence, in this light, in this warmth, in this silent unity of hands. Present—and ready for eternity, ripe for joy. This to me remains the vision of marriage, of its heavenly beauty.
Alexander Schmemann, For the Life of the World, quoted in A New Icon of Marriage | Alastair’s Adversaria.