Started #reading: First Aid in Pastoral Care, ed. Leslie Virgo. 
Probably not a book I’ll end up reading cover to cover, though there are some interesting looking essays in it (including one by Kenneth Leech). 
What I’ve bought it for was to see if I can piece together in my mind the tremendously useful talk I once heard the late Canon Virgo give on this subject. All I can remember now – and it’s been of immeasurable benefit to me over the years – is his use of Romans 12:3 to describe a healthy attitude towards oneself: "think of yourself with sober judgement," neither talking oneself down nor puffing oneself up. 

Started #reading: First Aid in Pastoral Care, ed. Leslie Virgo. 

Probably not a book I’ll end up reading cover to cover, though there are some interesting looking essays in it (including one by Kenneth Leech). 

What I’ve bought it for was to see if I can piece together in my mind the tremendously useful talk I once heard the late Canon Virgo give on this subject. All I can remember now – and it’s been of immeasurable benefit to me over the years – is his use of Romans 12:3 to describe a healthy attitude towards oneself: "think of yourself with sober judgement," neither talking oneself down nor puffing oneself up. 

Bobby Kennedy recently made me the soul-stirring promise that one day – thirty years, if I’m lucky – I can be President too. It never entered this boy’s mind, I suppose – it has not entered the country’s mind yet – that perhaps I wouldn’t want to be. And in any case, what really exercises my mind is not this hypothetical day on which some other Negro ‘first’ will become the first Negro President. What I am really curious about is just what kind of country he’ll be President of. […]

The key to [Mr Kennedy’s] statement, as I understand it, is that when Negroes have achieved the Americanism of the Irish, they will be allowed to get to Washington. Now, to tell the truth, I personally do not feel that what I would like to see come out of the last three hundred years is another Kennedy. I think the price was too high, and I insist that I believe we are better than that.

James Baldwin, speaking in 1961. Quoted in The Cross of Redemption, pp.10, 13f.

So now (as Randall Kenan observes in the introduction) we know what Baldwin would have thought of Barack Obama.